Many adoptions are extremely trying — some children come home having experienced things that nobody wants to or can comfortably talk openly about without betraying their children's privacy. For some parents, it's a long and difficult road full of bumps so big they seem like mountains. But in the end, those that stayed the course agree on one thing — it was worth it.

Boy — times two

Thomas and Claire (names have been changed) were picked by state officials as the best choice for the two little boys (ages 2 and 4) they wanted to adopt, given stacks of paperwork and told to make a decision 24 hours later. The boys were in a wonderful foster family situation, and initial meetings with the boys went well. "The youngest became aggressive and dangerous in his foster home — behavior that continues to this day. He had a speech delay, so we foolishly thought that his aggressive behavior was because of the speech delay. Now we are not sure if this aggression will ever go away," shares Claire. "The state let us have them and sent them with really no way for us to get medical coverage, because there were so many clerical issues in the paperwork. After that, we knew that we needed to finalize the adoption as we were the last hope for these boys." Both boys have been diagnosed with Reactive Attachment Disorder (RAD) and ADHD.

We have lost friends because we listened to experts that therapies conflicted and made things worse. It was very trying on our marriage and our daughter's well-being.

Thomas adds, "We have lost friends because we listened to experts that therapies conflicted and made things worse. It was very trying on our marriage and our daughter's well-being. If we would have known up front what we were in for with the RAD then we could have targeted their therapies instead of taking shots in the dark," he says.

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Topics: adoption